Top 10 Tourist Attractions Parione District Rome

The sixth rione of Rome, Parione, is not the largest district of the city, but it is located in the middle of the historic centre and therefore has a very interesting Top 10 Tourist Attractions. These include two of the most beautiful squares in the city.

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Corso del Rinascimento Rome

The Corso del Rinascimento in Rome connects the Piazza delle Cinque Lune to the Corso Vittorio Emanuele II. The street runs parallel to the long side of the Piazza Navona. The Piazza Madama divides the street into two sections. The Corso del Rinascimento forms the border between the districts of Parione (on the west side) and Sant’Eustachio (east side).

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Nostra Signora del Sacro Cuore Church Rome

The Nostra Signora del Sacro Cuore Church in Rome is also known as the San Giacomo degli Spagnoli Church. This church has two facades, the main one being on the Corso del Risorgimento. The second facade is on the Piazza Navona. Continue reading “Nostra Signora del Sacro Cuore Church Rome”

Campo de Fiori Market Rome

The daily market at the Campo de’ Fiori is one of the oldest in Rome. Its official name is Mercato Regionale Regola, even though the square is not in the Regola, but in the Parione district. Thanks to its location it is always mentioned in guidebooks, but it is far less authentic and way more expensive than similar markets in the city.

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Campo de’ Fiori Rome

Especially at night-time, when the Campo de’ Fiori turns into one of the liveliest squares in Rome, it is hard to imagine that this beautiful, crowded square started its existence as a simple meadow. In the mornings the square hosts a weekday market.

Campo de’ Fiori Rome

It is located close to the river Tiber, in one of Rome‘s most beautiful and picturesque districts, and is the backdrop of one of Rome’s most interesting weekday markets (which was formerly held in the nearby Piazza Navona).

The name, “Field of Flowers”, is a reminder of its origins as a pasture where animals used to graze. This lasted until 1440, when the area was paved.

From then on it became a place where pilgrims found hospitality in inns and hotels, a characteristic which has not changed much over the years. Campo de’ Fiori nowadays is still a square lined by restaurants and pubs of all kinds.

The statue in the middle of the square depicts Giordano Bruno, a philosopher who was sent to the stake in the year 1600 because of his heretic ideas. Note that he is placed in such a way that he is looking directly towards the Vatican City.

Unfortunately nowadays the Campo has become the last stop of most of the pub crawls organized in Rome, and drunken youths screaming and fighting may ruin the atmosphere.

Campo de Fiori Market

The daily market at the Campo de’ Fiori (7 AM till 2 PM, except Sundays) is one of the oldest in Rome. Its official name is Mercato Regionale Regola, even though the square is not in the Regola, but in the Parione district.

Public transport

The nearest bus stop is Corso Vittorio Emanuele/Navona (46, 62, 64, 916, 916F, N5, N15, N20).

Campo de’ Fiori – Rome

Via dei Banchi Vecchi Rome

The Via dei Banchi Vecchi is one of the most beautiful streets in the center of Rome and even though it is very short it still manages to run through three rioni: Ponte, Parione and Regola.

Via dei Banchi Vecchi Rome

It starts almost at the end of the Corso Vittorio Emanuele II and goes off in south-eastern directions to end after a couple of blocks and split up into the Via del Pellegrino and the Via di Monserrato.

Originally the Via dei Banchi Vecchi was divided into two parts, the Via della Chiavica di Santa Lucia and the Via dei Banchi. The first part got its name from a church (Santa Lucia del Gonfalone) and a sewer and the second part because of the presence of the mint and of a number of banks.

When the mint was moved the street came to be called the Via dei Banchi Vecchi and the street the mint was moved to, on the other side of the Corso Vittorio Emanuele II, the Via dei Banchi Nuovi.

Tourist attractions in the Via dei Banchi Vecchi are the above-mentioned Santa Lucia del Gonfalone church and the Palazzo Crivelli.

Via dei Banchi Vecchi – Rome