Roma Pass 2020

Roma Pass - Top 7 Rome Tips

The Roma Pass is a combined public transportation and museum pass for Rome, Italy. From the moment it is validated the Roma Pass gives unlimited access to three days of public transportation in Rome. The first two museums or monuments visited (but note that the Vatican Museums are not included) are free, and the following attractions can be seen at a reduced admission price. The pass also allows you to skip the lines at various tourist attractions. The price of the Roma Pass for 2020 is 38,50 Euros. For people who visit Rome for less than 3 days there is an alternative pass (as of April 1st, 2014) called the Roma Pass 48 Hours.

Roma Pass 2020

Roma PassThe Roma Pass used to consist of two different parts. There was one public transport pass, while a different pass was to be used for the tourist sights. Now you just need one card, which becomes valid from the moment you use it first.

A big advantage of the Roma Pass is that at the first two museums or monuments visited it allows the visitor to skip the line. You can bypass the ticket office and go directly through the turnstiles. Especially at the Colosseum this can save you several hours of queuing. (If you don’t have the Roma Pass, visit our Colosseum opening hours page to learn how to skip the lines).

For sights visited after the first two you do need to line up in order to get your discounted ticket.

With the Roma Pass you also sometimes pay reduced prices at certain special events and exhibitions.

Is the Roma Pass useful?

The Roma Pass is less useful than it may seem. Many of the main attractions, and that includes Saint Peter’s Basilica and the Pantheon, are free anyway. The Vatican Museums and Sistine Chapel are not included. Many of the other principal Rome tourist attractions are squares, fountains and picturesque alleys and streets, which are also obviously free.

The historical center of Rome is relatively small and there are only short walking distances between sights. This means that you do not need public transport as often as you would expect either.

The Roma Pass is superfluous for Europeans younger than 18 or older than 65, since they get free entrance to all of Rome’s tourist attractions anyway. European visitors between 18 and 25 get discounts at all these attractions, so it is highly debatable whether or not the Roma Pass is worth their while.

Where to get the Pass

The Roma Pass can be bought at the museums and monuments of Rome themselves. However, this would mean having to line up again, so it is better to get them at the Rome tourist information kiosks near the major attractions. In theory tobacconists and newspaper stands also sell them, but in reality they often seem to have just run out of them.

Together with the pass you will get a Roma Pass Kit, which consists of a map of Rome and a list of the museums an monuments included. Roma News, a small magazine describing the various exhibitions, concerts and other events the Roma Pass will give you a discount to is also provided.

After the first time the Pass has been used, the holder needs to write his/her full name and date of birth in the apposite space. Identification is also required.

Medical help

As of 2010 holders of the Roma Pass needing medical assistance can phone a call center, which will supply medical help in various languages. Note that you can also go to the Pronto Soccorso at the nearest hospital, which will give you free help anyway.

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